javascript – convert string into array of integers-ThrowExceptions

Exception or error:

I want to convert the following string '14 2' into an array of two integers.
How can I do it ?

How to solve:

You can .split() to get an array of strings, then loop through to convert them to numbers, like this:

var myArray = "14 2".split(" ");
for(var i=0; i<myArray.length; i++) { myArray[i] = +myArray[i]; } 
//use myArray, it's an array of numbers

The +myArray[i] is just a quick way to do the number conversion, if you’re sure they’re integers you can just do:

for(var i=0; i<myArray.length; i++) { myArray[i] = parseInt(myArray[i], 10); } 

###

A quick one for modern browsers:

'14 2'.split(' ').map(Number);

// [14, 2]`

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SO…older thread, I know, but…

EDIT

@RoccoMusolino had a nice catch; here’s an alternative:

TL;DR:

 const intArray = [...("5 6 7 69 foo 0".split(' ').filter(i => /\d/g.test(i)))]

WRONG: "5 6 note this foo".split(" ").map(Number).filter(Boolean); // [5, 6]

There is a subtle flaw in the more elegant solutions listed here, specifically @amillara and @Marcus’ otherwise beautiful answers.

The problem occurs when an element of the string array isn’t integer-like, perhaps in a case without validation on an input. For a contrived example…

The problem:


var effedIntArray = "5 6 7 69 foo".split(' ').map(Number); // [5, 6, 7, 69, NaN]

Since you obviously want a PURE int array, that’s a problem. Honestly, I didn’t catch this until I copy-pasted SO code into my script… :/

The (slightly-less-baller) fix:


var intArray = "5 6 7 69 foo".split(" ").map(Number).filter(Boolean); // [5, 6, 7, 69]

So, now even when you have crap int string, your output is a pure integer array. The others are really sexy in most cases, but I did want to offer my mostly rambly w’actually. It is still a one-liner though, to my credit…

Hope it saves someone time!

###

var result = "14 2".split(" ").map(function(x){return parseInt(x)});

###

An alternative to Tushar Gupta answer would be :

'14 2'.split(' ').map(x=>+x);

// [14, 2]`

In code golf you save 1 character.
Here the “+” is “unary plus” operator, works like parseInt.

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First split the string on spaces:

var result = '14 2'.split(' ');

Then convert the result array of strings into integers:

for (var i in result) {
    result[i] = parseInt(result[i], 10);
}

###

The point against parseInt-approach:

There’s no need to use lambdas and/or give radix parameter to parseInt, just use parseFloat or Number instead.


Reasons:

  1. It’s working:

    var src = "1,2,5,4,3";
    var ids = src.split(',').map(parseFloat); // [1, 2, 5, 4, 3]
    
    var obj = {1: ..., 3: ..., 4: ..., 7: ...};
    var keys= Object.keys(obj); // ["1", "3", "4", "7"]
    var ids = keys.map(parseFloat); // [1, 3, 4, 7]
    
    var arr = ["1", 5, "7", 11];
    var ints= arr.map(parseFloat); // [1, 5, 7, 11]
    ints[1] === "5" // false
    ints[1] === 5   // true
    ints[2] === "7" // false
    ints[2] === 7   // true
    
  2. It’s shorter.

  3. It’s a tiny bit quickier and takes advantage of cache, when parseInt-approach – doesn’t:

      // execution time measure function
      // keep it simple, yeah?
    > var f = (function (arr, c, n, m) {
          var i,t,m,s=n();
          for(i=0;i++<c;)t=arr.map(m);
          return n()-s
      }).bind(null, "2,4,6,8,0,9,7,5,3,1".split(','), 1000000, Date.now);
    
    > f(Number) // first launch, just warming-up cache
    > 3971 // nice =)
    
    > f(Number)
    > 3964 // still the same
    
    > f(function(e){return+e})
    > 5132 // yup, just little bit slower
    
    > f(function(e){return+e})
    > 5112 // second run... and ok.
    
    > f(parseFloat)
    > 3727 // little bit quicker than .map(Number)
    
    > f(parseFloat)
    > 3737 // all ok
    
    > f(function(e){return parseInt(e,10)})
    > 21852 // awww, how adorable...
    
    > f(function(e){return parseInt(e)})
    > 22928 // maybe, without '10'?.. nope.
    
    > f(function(e){return parseInt(e)})
    > 22769 // second run... and nothing changes.
    
    > f(Number)
    > 3873 // and again
    > f(parseFloat)
    > 3583 // and again
    > f(function(e){return+e})
    > 4967 // and again
    
    > f(function(e){return parseInt(e,10)})
    > 21649 // dammit 'parseInt'! >_<
    

Notice: In Firefox parseInt works about 4 times faster, but still slower than others. In total: +e < Number < parseFloat < parseInt

###

Just for fun I thought I’d throw a forEach(f()) solution in too.

var a=[];
"14 2".split(" ").forEach(function(e){a.push(parseInt(e,10))});

// a = [14,2]

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let idsArray = ids.split(',').map((x) => parseInt(x));

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Better one line solution:

var answerInt = [];
var answerString = "1 2 3 4";
answerString.split(' ').forEach(function (item) {
   answerInt.push(parseInt(item))
});

###

us the split function:

var splitresult = "14 2".split(" ");

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